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News and knowledge

  • Lucile

    A new study published today used modern genetics tools to trace the history of the Coffea arabica species, the most common and economically important commercial coffee crop species worldwide. Researchers confirmed the significantly likelihood that C. arabica derived from a single speciation event, a spontaneous coupling of individuals of two different species—Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides—that brought together the two genomes to create a new species.

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  • Taking it to the field

    Project Update

    Date: 2.4.20
    Farmer Field Day

    In November 2019, 12 coffee farmers in Jinotega, Nicaragua took a break from the intense work of harvesting the coffee on their farms to gather in front of the street—the term in Spanish for the space between rows of coffee trees on a farm.

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  • Rust lesions
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    Rust lesions
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    Rust lesions on a leaf. Photo credit: Jacques Avelino

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    Researchers and students from CIRAD and CATIE, with funding from World Coffee Research, spent nearly a year taking exhaustive measurements of the movement of rust spores in a coffee agroforestry research site at CATIE in Turrialba, Costa Rica. Their findings were published in Crop Protection.

    Researchers have known for years that shade can have both positive and negative effects on coffee leaf rust—but this team wanted to understand what was behind some of those different impacts, so that better guidance can be provided to coffee farmers interested in agroforestry—an increasingly important approach for managing rising temperatu...

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