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News and knowledge

  • Yemeni coffee—how genetically diverse is it?

    Project Update

    Date: 9.18.20
    yemen terraces

    Until recently, very little was known about the diversity of Yemen’s coffees outside of anecdotes and observation. But in 2014, WCR partnered with Dr. Al Hakimi of S'ana University to explore the diversity of Yemeni coffees as part of a larger analysis of arabica genetic diversity. The study, published in Nature Scientific Reports in January 2020, expanded our knowledge of Yemen coffee's genetic diversity.

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  • It starts with a seed—but what seed is it?

    Project Update

    Date: 9.1.20
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    WCR undertook crucial work in 2019 to advance our Nursery Development Program. Before nursery training programs begin, program workers typically conduct a baseline assessment of the seed and nursery production systems in a location. In 2019, WCR conducted seed sector analyses in countries with particularly difficult and disorganized seed production systems, including Mexico and the Philippines. The findings pave the way for a better future.

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  • Tierra Baja: Profitability at lower altitudes

    Project Update

    Date: 7.29.20
    Tierra Baja 1

    Tierra Baja doesn’t have the advantage of high altitude that many specialty-coffee-producing farms possess. The farm, whose name translates to “Low Land,” is located at 830 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.), where growing high-quality coffee is a challenge. Farms at this altitude typically cannot grow coffee varieties susceptible to coffee leaf rust because their coffees will not earn a high enough price to cover the cost of fighting pervasive rust damage.

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  • Lucile

    A new study published today used modern genetics tools to trace the history of the Coffea arabica species, the most common and economically important commercial coffee crop species worldwide. Researchers confirmed the significantly likelihood that C. arabica derived from a single speciation event, a spontaneous coupling of individuals of two different species—Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides—that brought together the two genomes to create a new species.

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  • Taking it to the field

    Project Update

    Date: 2.4.20
    Farmer Field Day

    In November 2019, 12 coffee farmers in Jinotega, Nicaragua took a break from the intense work of harvesting the coffee on their farms to gather in front of the street—the term in Spanish for the space between rows of coffee trees on a farm.

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